Ankle Sprain Archives

Sprained Ankle Symptoms

The sprained ankle is the most common musculoskeletal injury seen by physicians caring for active youngsters and adults.

Sprained Ankles account for approximately 1/4th of all sports-related injuries and is commonly seen in athletes participating in basketball, soccer, or football.

More than 25,000 people sprain their ankle each day

The vast majority of ankle sprains can be treated with adhesive tape strapping or semirigid orthotics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication (advil or ibuprofen) followed by rehabilitation.

A sprain is caused by the twisting or bending of a joint into a position it was not designed to move.

The ankle is the most commonly sprained joint.

Mild to severe swelling and bruising can accompany a sprain to the ankle.

Bruising usually indicates tearing of ligament tissue and a more severe sprain.

The most common way the ankle is injured is when the ankle is twisted inward (inversion injury). With this injury, ligaments that support the ankle can be torn which lead to swelling, inflammation, and bruising around the ankle.

An ankle sprain injury may take a few weeks to many months to fully heal but with an advanced rehab protocol, rehabilitation is possible in as little as 7-10 days.

Often, the injured ankle remains a little weaker and less stable than the uninjured one. A proper recovery program such as the one found at www.fastrehab.com can prevent this problem.

Some common symptoms of a sprain are pain around the joint, swelling, and bruising.

The vast majority of ankle sprains can be treated by taping the ankle or using an ankle brace and ibuprofen or other anti-inflammatory medication followed by a comprehensive sprained ankle rehabilitation program.

Key points of rehabilitation are control of pain and swelling acutely with ibuprofen nd RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation), then restoring normal range of motion, strengthening muscle groups, and retraining proprioception of the ankle joint.

Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain.

A sprain is an injury to ligaments, which connect bones to one another.

In most cases of ankle sprain, the ankle is twisted inward, causing tiny tears in the ligaments. This makes the ankle somewhat unstable. The tearing leads to swelling and bruising, making it difficult to bear weight on the joint.

Ankle injuries are the most frequent cause of physician evaluation in a sports-oriented environment. The lateral ligaments are most commonly injured. With a detailed history, physical and radiographic examination to avoid missing underlying pathology, the primary care physician can diagnose and treat the majority of ankle injuries. Occasionally, stress radiographs, arthograms, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is needed. The vast majority of ankle sprains can be treated with adhesive tape strapping or semirigid orthotics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication followed by rehabilitation. Key points of rehabilitation are control of pain and swelling acutely with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories and RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation), then restoring normal range of motion, strengthening muscle groups, and retraining proprioception of the ankle joint.

A sprain is caused by the twisting or bending of a joint into a position it was not designed to move. The ankle is the most commonly sprained joint.

Some common symptoms of a sprain are pain around the joint, swelling, and bruising.
Mild to severe swelling and bruising can accompany a sprain to the ankle. Bruising usually indicates tearing of ligament tissue and a more severe sprain.

An ankle sprain is a common injury to the ankle. The most common way the ankle is injured is when the ankle is twisted inward (inversion injury). With this injury, ligaments that support the ankle can be torn which lead to swelling, inflammation, and bruising around the ankle. An ankle sprain injury may take a few weeks to many months to fully heal.

Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. A sprain is an injury to ligaments, which connect bones to one another. In most cases of ankle sprain, the ankle is twisted inward, causing tiny tears in the ligaments. This makes the ankle somewhat unstable. The tearing leads to swelling and bruising, making it difficult to bear weight on the joint.

Once an ankle is sprained, the injury may take a few weeks to many months to fully heal. Often, the injured ankle remains a little weaker and less stable than the uninjured one. A proper recovery program can prevent this problem.

Other structures in the ankle that can be damaged and cause pain are tendons (which join muscles to bone), cartilage (which cushions joints), and blood vessels. Adjacent areas can cause pain to be referred to (felt in) the ankle — these include the foot, lower leg, knee, and even hip.

Sprained ankles will not heal themselves. They need to be rehabbed or you are virtually guaranteed to have another sprain that is more severe within 12 months from your first injury.

This data comes from hospital emergency room visits.

So if you want to get your ankle better and not have soreness and stiffness for a long time, you need to follow a proven rehab program.

The rehab program that you choose should reduce swelling quickly, restore range of motion, strengthen the muscles that support the ankle and re-calibrate the position sensors in your foot that tell your brain the position your foot is in. Not getting these position sensors back in alignment with your brain is THE PRIMARY cause of recurring ankle sprains according to a study done by the University of Utah.

Here’s the program we recommend:

Sprained Ankle Rehab Program

The Truth about Healing Sprained Ankles with Patches, Potions and Lotions

If you do a Google search for sprained ankle rehab, you will see a lot of ads selling patches, potions, and lotions that promise you can heal your sprained ankle in “2-4 patches” or in 4 days.

 

Some of the ads say that you get instant healing….yeah, right. I think that you probably have a reduction in pain as a result of a topical anesthetic, but that is just speculation.

But if it were true. If you could apply a patch, rub on a lotion, or take a potion and your ankle would be “miraculously healed”…would you really believe your ankle was healed?

The answer is probably no.

A big part of the rehab process is mental. You start a rehab program and as you follow it, you start seeing progress in the strength of your ankle. As rehab continues, you continue to see improvement…until the day comes when you are ready to return to normal activity.

Now comes the time when you will put your ankle to the test…will it hold up? Will you injure it again? Did the rehab really work?

If you have used a patch, potion or lotion…you won’t have the confidence that your ankle is truly stronger and healed.

After all, you didn’t have to work to get it back into shape. How could it actually be healed if you didn’t do anything to strengthen the muscles, tendons and ligaments?

I know that when I sprained my ankle (and this applies to other injuries as well) I had to overcome the fear that I may injure it again. Since I rehabbed my ankle and had to work to rebuild it, I could remind myself that I had worked hard and that my ankle was strong.

I was able to get back into my normal routine faster and with more confidence than I would have had if I had used a patch, a potion or a lotion.

The question I have to ask about the patches, potions and lotions is:

If they are so good, don’t you think that top level athletes who earn millions of dollars per year would be using them?

There is a lotion that will give you some relief from the pain but it will not help your ankle to heal. It is called Real Time Pain Relief and you can learn more about it here: RTPR

They have a special deal where you can try it for just $5. Just click the link above to get more info. By the way I do get some free RTPR if you decide to give it a shot. That’s the deal I made with them. No reason they should make money for nothing.

If you want to learn more about rehabbing a sprained ankle using a proven method that will give you stronger ankles as well as the confidence you need to return to your normal activity, then you should click on the following link:

Sprained ankle rehab program

When you visit you will read about my journey to discovering the fastest and most effective rehab program available today. It has all of the ninja secrets to getting your ankle healed completely in just a few days.

Get your ankle rehabbed and get back in the game!

Here’s the link again: Fastrehab

How long should it take to rehab a sprained ankle after you’ve injured it?

Sprained ankle care, ankle rehab and treating a sprained ankle depend on the severity of the sprain, but a level 1 or mild level 2 sprain should reasonably be rehabbed in a maximum of 2-3 weeks. It all depends on how fast you heal and how severe the damage is.

But you must have realistic expectations for completely rehabbing a sprained ankle and not rush it. You need to learn how to listen to what your body is telling you and then react appropriately. Good sprained ankle care demands that ankle rehab is only started after visiting a doctor and verifying there is no structural damage.

Years ago, when an athlete would tear his ACL it was a career ending injury. Then surgeons started repairing ACL damage through surgery. The injury was no long career ending, but just delayed the career 12-18 months.

Now, with the advent of arthroscopic surgery a large number of athletes with knee injuries are able to return to competition within the same season.

Why is it that with the advancement of medicine most people still believe that an ankle sprain should take 2-3 months to heal?

I just read an article in a respected running magazine that stated an ankle sprain would take 2-3 months to heal.

I have personally experienced much faster recovery than that. In fact, with an aggressive physical therapy regimen, I was able to rehab a severe level 1/mild level 2 ankle sprain within 5 days. By rehab, I mean that I was able to compete at NCAA division 1 level basketball within 5 days of a severe ankle sprain.

Don’t fall for the wait and it will all work out approach! You are letting life pass you by! Treating a sprained ankle with an extremely conservative approach after the doctor has confirmed there is no structural damage is keeping you from enjoying your life.

Here’s where you can get a program that is proven to rehab ankles quickly and that will strengthen them as well.

Check out the best program to use when caring for an ankle sprain:

How To Heal Your Sprained Ankle in & Days or Less™

The program has a guarantee. It will work for you or you get 100% of your money back.

I’ll talk about re-calibrating your balance after spraining your ankle, its really simple.

Why People Suffer from One Ankle Sprain After Another

Here’s the key in avoiding/preventing one sprained ankle after another – make sure your brain knows what position your anke is in.

When you sprain your ankle, there is more that happens than just damage to tendons, ligaments, and connective tissues…the electrical connection in your foot that tells your brain the position of your foot in relation to your body may also be damaged. Your sore ankle needs more than just strengthening, it needs to be re-calibrated with your brain.

The technical term is proprioceptors, but to make it simple, it is the sensor in your foot that tells your brain the position of your foot in relation to your body.

Why is this important? Because if your sore ankle is telling your brain that it is flat when in actuality it is at an angle you will injure your ankle again and it will more severe than the last time. When this sensor is not working properly in conjunction with the brain your balance can also be affected.

Most sprained ankle rehab programs or sprained ankle rehab kits that are being sold today on the internet do not have any component that addresses re-aligning, re-connecting or recalibrating the electrical connection between the brain and the sensor in your foot. This aspect of rehab is just as important as ankle strengthening.

The best way to re-connect the sensor in your foot with your brain is by using a wobble board. The wobble board will help you improve your balance and re-calibrate the sensor in your foot with your brain so your brain always knows the correct location of your foot in relation to your body.

Until I integrated the use of a wobbleboard into my sprained ankle rehab regimen, I continued to have recurring ankle sprains and each one of them was more severe.

If you want more information including a video on how to properly use a wobbleboard, you can find it in my How to Heal Your Sprained Ankle in 7 Days or Less Ankle Rehab Program.