The sprained ankle is the most common musculoskeletal injury seen by physicians caring for active youngsters and adults.

Sprained Ankles account for approximately 1/4th of all sports-related injuries and is commonly seen in athletes participating in basketball, soccer, or football.

More than 25,000 people sprain their ankle each day

The vast majority of ankle sprains can be treated with adhesive tape strapping or semirigid orthotics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication (advil or ibuprofen) followed by rehabilitation.

A sprain is caused by the twisting or bending of a joint into a position it was not designed to move.

The ankle is the most commonly sprained joint.

Mild to severe swelling and bruising can accompany a sprain to the ankle.

Bruising usually indicates tearing of ligament tissue and a more severe sprain.

The most common way the ankle is injured is when the ankle is twisted inward (inversion injury). With this injury, ligaments that support the ankle can be torn which lead to swelling, inflammation, and bruising around the ankle.

An ankle sprain injury may take a few weeks to many months to fully heal but with an advanced rehab protocol, rehabilitation is possible in as little as 7-10 days.

Often, the injured ankle remains a little weaker and less stable than the uninjured one. A proper recovery program such as the one found at www.fastrehab.com can prevent this problem.

Some common symptoms of a sprain are pain around the joint, swelling, and bruising.

The vast majority of ankle sprains can be treated by taping the ankle or using an ankle brace and ibuprofen or other anti-inflammatory medication followed by a comprehensive sprained ankle rehabilitation program.

Key points of rehabilitation are control of pain and swelling acutely with ibuprofen nd RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation), then restoring normal range of motion, strengthening muscle groups, and retraining proprioception of the ankle joint.

Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain.

A sprain is an injury to ligaments, which connect bones to one another.

In most cases of ankle sprain, the ankle is twisted inward, causing tiny tears in the ligaments. This makes the ankle somewhat unstable. The tearing leads to swelling and bruising, making it difficult to bear weight on the joint.

Ankle injuries are the most frequent cause of physician evaluation in a sports-oriented environment. The lateral ligaments are most commonly injured. With a detailed history, physical and radiographic examination to avoid missing underlying pathology, the primary care physician can diagnose and treat the majority of ankle injuries. Occasionally, stress radiographs, arthograms, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is needed. The vast majority of ankle sprains can be treated with adhesive tape strapping or semirigid orthotics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication followed by rehabilitation. Key points of rehabilitation are control of pain and swelling acutely with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories and RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation), then restoring normal range of motion, strengthening muscle groups, and retraining proprioception of the ankle joint.

A sprain is caused by the twisting or bending of a joint into a position it was not designed to move. The ankle is the most commonly sprained joint.

Some common symptoms of a sprain are pain around the joint, swelling, and bruising.
Mild to severe swelling and bruising can accompany a sprain to the ankle. Bruising usually indicates tearing of ligament tissue and a more severe sprain.

An ankle sprain is a common injury to the ankle. The most common way the ankle is injured is when the ankle is twisted inward (inversion injury). With this injury, ligaments that support the ankle can be torn which lead to swelling, inflammation, and bruising around the ankle. An ankle sprain injury may take a few weeks to many months to fully heal.

Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. A sprain is an injury to ligaments, which connect bones to one another. In most cases of ankle sprain, the ankle is twisted inward, causing tiny tears in the ligaments. This makes the ankle somewhat unstable. The tearing leads to swelling and bruising, making it difficult to bear weight on the joint.

Once an ankle is sprained, the injury may take a few weeks to many months to fully heal. Often, the injured ankle remains a little weaker and less stable than the uninjured one. A proper recovery program can prevent this problem.

Other structures in the ankle that can be damaged and cause pain are tendons (which join muscles to bone), cartilage (which cushions joints), and blood vessels. Adjacent areas can cause pain to be referred to (felt in) the ankle — these include the foot, lower leg, knee, and even hip.

Sprained ankles will not heal themselves. They need to be rehabbed or you are virtually guaranteed to have another sprain that is more severe within 12 months from your first injury.

This data comes from hospital emergency room visits.

So if you want to get your ankle better and not have soreness and stiffness for a long time, you need to follow a proven rehab program.

The rehab program that you choose should reduce swelling quickly, restore range of motion, strengthen the muscles that support the ankle and re-calibrate the position sensors in your foot that tell your brain the position your foot is in. Not getting these position sensors back in alignment with your brain is THE PRIMARY cause of recurring ankle sprains according to a study done by the University of Utah.

Here’s the program we recommend:

Sprained Ankle Rehab Program

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